9mm Reloading
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Thread: 9mm Reloading

  1. #1
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    9mm Reloading

    Hi all,

    New to 9mm reloading and wondering about 2 questions. Can .356 bullet flat nosed be used? and can you use small pistol Magnum primers?
    Any help on these questions would be appreciated.

    Thank you.

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    A 9mm is .355 so a .356 might be ok if it were not a flat nose, I am thinking that will cause too much drag, and if it is a lead bullet that is not recommended in a hex barrel.


    Any Magnum primer is really for larger loads, care must be taken when matching higher powered primers with recommended powder loads, over-pressure is a bad thing, ummkay ?


    FYI, Google is your friend : .356+bullet+be+used+for+reloading+9mm/clik here

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    What reloading manual are you using?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anthonydaniel View Post
    Hi all,

    New to 9mm reloading and wondering about 2 questions. Can .356 bullet flat nosed be used? and can you use small pistol Magnum primers?
    Any help on these questions would be appreciated.

    Thank you.
    I use round nosed .356 9mm bullets... they work fine... are you shooting lead bullets? I have used flat nosed and hollow points also, but you have to be careful choosing your over all length... They might need to be a bit shorter... try loading up 50 or a hundred and shoot them to make sure they feed well in your gun... Then load more if those shoot well.

    People use magnum primers when that's all they can get... Like now... :-(

    Shouldn't be problem... Do you have a chronograph?
    "While the anti-gunners seem very concerned about the "one life" that your firearm might take -- they are not very concerned about the lives it will save." Jon H. Gutmacher, Florida Firearms - Law, Use & Ownership

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    Not a “flat nose” per se, but I’ve used truncated cone bullets with no problems.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FireCop203 View Post
    Not a “flat nose” per se, but I’ve used truncated cone bullets with no problems.
    Nothing wrong with other bullet shapes.

    It's important to do the plunk test to make sure the OAL for that round is good for your gun.
    "While the anti-gunners seem very concerned about the "one life" that your firearm might take -- they are not very concerned about the lives it will save." Jon H. Gutmacher, Florida Firearms - Law, Use & Ownership

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    Truncated cone are usually jacketed bullets, my idea of flat nose is a semi/full wad cutter design, which will make the OAL real important.




    Agree with JB about the plunk test.

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    9x19 guns happily use 0.355-0.357" jacketed bullets and 0.356-0.358" lead bullets.
    All a flat nose, JHP, or SWC means is that you need a slightly different COL to get 100% feed and chambering.
    A flat nose is simply cutting off part of the bullet meplat (nose) and moving that material to the bullet base. Thus, the COL will be shorter based on the material removed from the meplat.
    Like ANY time you change a bullet, you need to rework the load.
    I have never found a proper diameter bullet that I could not get to feed properly by simply adjusting the COL. That is almost 50 years of loading 9x19.
    Per Ramshot:
    "SPECIAL NOTE ON CARTRIDGE OVERALL LENGTH “COL”
    It is important to note that the SAAMI “COL” values are for the firearms and ammunition manufacturers industry and must be seen as a guideline only.
    The individual reloader is free to adjust this dimension to suit their particular firearm-component-weapon combination.
    This parameter is determined by various dimensions such as
    1) magazine length (space),
    2) freebore-lead dimensions of the barrel,
    3) ogive or profile of the projectile and
    4) position of cannelure or crimp groove.
    Always begin loading at the minimum ‘Start Load.’"


    Your COL (OAL) is determined by your barrel (chamber and throat dimensions) and your gun (feed ramp) and your magazine (COL that fits magazine and when the magazine lips release the round for feeding) and the PARTICULAR bullet you are using. What worked in a pressure barrel or the lab's gun or in my gun has very little to do with what will work best in your gun.
    Take the barrel out of the gun. Create two inert dummy rounds (no powder or primer) at max COL and remove enough case mouth flare for rounds to chamber (you can achieve this by using a sized case—expand-and-flare it, and remove the flare just until the case "plunks" in the barrel).
    Drop the inert rounds in and decrease the COL until they chamber completely. This will be your "max" effective COL. I prefer to have the case head flush with the barrel hood. After this, place the inert rounds in the magazine and be sure they fit the magazine and feed and chamber.
    You can also do this for any chambering problems you have. Remove the barrel and drop rounds in until you find one that won't chamber. Take that round and "paint" the bullet and case black with Magic Marker or other marker. Drop round in barrel (or gage) and rotate it back-and-forth.
    Remove and inspect the round:
    1) scratches on bullet--COL is too long
    2) scratches on edge of the case mouth--insufficient crimp
    3) scratches just below the case mouth--too much crimp, you're crushing the case
    4) scratches on case at base of bullet--bullet seated crooked due to insufficient case expansion (not case mouth flare) or improper seating stem fit
    5) scratches on case just above extractor groove--case bulge not removed during sizing. May need a bulge buster.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Otintx View Post
    Truncated cone are usually jacketed bullets, my idea of flat nose is a semi/full wad cutter design, which will make the OAL real important.




    Agree with JB about the plunk test.

    Correction about jacketed bullets, a "full wad cutter bullet" is a case with the lead bullet seated flush with the case mouth, there is no lead past the case mouth, thus it will not be a jacketed salvo.

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    Don't call a SWC/WC a "flat nose" bullet. We already HAVE real flat nose bullets. Call something what it IS and don't make up names.
    All my 9x19 guns, including pre-WWII Lugers and WWII P-38s feed all types of bullets just fine (except for WCs, as they are simply NOT a regular bullet). They all feed 0.355-0.357" jacketed and 0.356-0.359" lead bullets just fine.
    IF you look in a reloading manual, you'll see lots of different shapes of bullets being used.

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